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tv   The Context with Christian Fraser  BBC News  May 24, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. a culture set at the top — downing street insiders describe parties during lockdown that went all night. bins full of empty bottles, staff sitting on each other�*s laps. and they did it because they believed they had mrjohnson�*s "implicit permission". he wasn't there saying, "this shouldn't be happening." he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? 40% of british households could soon be in fuel poverty — britain's energy regulator says bills willjump by another £800 in october, with further rises possible in 2023. hacked police files reveal the details of thousands of uyghurs detained in xinjiang — the oldest in detention is 73, the youngest, just 15.
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and all eyes on the georgia primaries, it's a big night for the gop — and for donald trump. what will it tell about his power to shape the republican party? tonight with the context — former eu foreign policy adviser nathalie tocci, and bryan lanza, a former trump communications director. hello, welcome to the programme. we don't yet have sue grey's full report into the parties held in downing street during lockdown, but we do have new and damning evidence of what went on. for the first time, insiders who attended these gatherings have told the bbc that parties were routine. they say staff sat on each other�*s laps at a leaving do in november 2020, the same party at which the prime minister is seen raising a glass, and that security guards were laughed at when they tried
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to stop one party from taking place. laura keunssberg has spoken to three people who worked in whitehall, for the bbc�*s panorama programme, one of whom had attended one of these parties. their voices are spoken by actors. was it sometimes like the morning after? a mess. there were bottles, empties, rubbish — in the bin, but overflowing. 0r, indeed, sometimes left on the table. you would go into work in the morning, in ten downing street, and find empty bottles littered around the place? yup. and for the first time, people who were there describe what the culture was like. they were every week. the event invites for friday press office drinks were just nailed into the diary. there were actually invites, a weekly regular invite to drinks on friday nights? yes, wine time fridays, invites that were in everyonemy calendar for every friday at 4pm.
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—— everyone's calendar. 4pm in the afternoon was wine time? yes. 0ne staffer said they felt borisjohnson had given permission for these events to take place by virtue of his attendance. he was there! he may havejust been popping through on the way to his flat, because that's what would happen. you know, he wasn't there saying, "this shouldn't be happening." he wasn't saying, "can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on?" no, he wasn't telling anybody that — he was grabbing a glass for himself. let's speak to political correspondent helen catt. what have we heard from downing street? well the prime minister's official spokesperson, journalists asked him about these interviews earlier today, and he said that boris johnson takes revelations about what happened in downing street during lockdown very seriously. downing street said that the document that sue gray has already report, her
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interim report which came out a couple months ago, raised some of these challenges and that wholesale changes in how number ten operated remade as a result. the spokesman said further changes are to come. borisjohnson himself has said he will address parliament in full once sue gray's report is published — and it's widely expected in westminster that that is likely to happen in the next couple of days, perhaps as soon as tomorrow, though we can't know this for certain largely because after thursday, parliament breaks up for a week—long recess. if boris johnson is going to be addressing parliament, it needs to be sitting. the expectations we will get that report in the next couple days. borisjohnson is do to address what's known as the 1922 committee tomorrow — that means all conservative backbenchers, mps who aren't met democrat ministers, those saying he needs to explain the things we've seen in recent days like the photographs that came out
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last night, some of those reports you heard there from the insiders talking to laura kuenssberg. so certainly he's under pressure to give some sort of explanation and is due to give at least some of that to his backbenchers tomorrow night. helen, thanks for that. there are two important by—elections coming that might tell us how this is being judged are country. but in the meantime, the more important electorate are the conservative backbenchers. here's tom tugendhat — chair of foreign relations committee — who has already called on the prime minister to go. well, the implications are it has a direct effect on the governance of the united kingdom, a direct effect on the cost of living of families across the united kingdom. it has a direct affect on the way we are seen by friends and allies, but also certainly by enemies and rivals around the world. i think seriousness matters, i'm afraid. how is this being seen across europe? how is this being seen across euro e? ., ., ., ., “ how is this being seen across euro e? ., ., ., ., ,, ,, europe? for a while, it looked like pa ate europe? for a while, it looked like partygate was _ europe? for a while, it looked like partygate was over, _ europe? for a while, it looked like partygate was over, nobody - europe? for a while, it looked likej partygate was over, nobody talked about _ partygate was over, nobody talked about it _ partygate was over, nobody talked about it any more. now it's back with_ about it any more. now it's back with a _ about it any more. now it's back with a vengeance, and it's back in a
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way which not only puts the issue of disrespect— way which not only puts the issue of disrespect back in the spotlight, and this— disrespect back in the spotlight, and this was very much the case when the connection was being made between — the connection was being made between the partying going on on the one hand _ between the partying going on on the one hand while on the other, a pandemic— one hand while on the other, a pandemic and the associated lockdowns are part of that roaring in the _ lockdowns are part of that roaring in the meantime. but especially now in the meantime. but especially now in the _ in the meantime. but especially now in the context of the war in ukraine, _ in the context of the war in ukraine, where such a big part of the story— ukraine, where such a big part of the story is— ukraine, where such a big part of the story is essentially the balance between _ the story is essentially the balance between truth and lies, the way in which _ between truth and lies, the way in which the — between truth and lies, the way in which the lying about these parties also brings back partygate in a tiny new light, — also brings back partygate in a tiny new light, i— also brings back partygate in a tiny new light, i think. also brings back partygate in a tiny new light, ithink.— new light, i think. you're being very diplomatic _ new light, i think. you're being very diplomatic there. - new light, i think. you're being very diplomatic there. are - new light, i think. you're being very diplomatic there. are you | very diplomatic there. are you saying across europe, people don't believe this prime minister? weill. saying across europe, people don't believe this prime minister? well, i think very clearly, _ believe this prime minister? well, i think very clearly, if _ believe this prime minister? well, i think very clearly, if one _ believe this prime minister? well, i think very clearly, if one lies - believe this prime minister? well, i think very clearly, if one lies so - think very clearly, if one lies so blatantly— think very clearly, if one lies so blatantly to one's on parliament about _ blatantly to one's on parliament about one —
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blatantly to one's on parliament about one issue, the very least, the question— about one issue, the very least, the question is— about one issue, the very least, the question is being raised about whether— question is being raised about whether the truth is being said about— whether the truth is being said about other issues, as well for step the questions are being raised at a time when, — the questions are being raised at a time when, let's face it, we talked about— time when, let's face it, we talked about on— time when, let's face it, we talked about on this programme in past weeks. _ about on this programme in past weeks, overthe about on this programme in past weeks, over the course of this war, on a _ weeks, over the course of this war, on a whole. — weeks, over the course of this war, on a whole, the united kingdom has actually— on a whole, the united kingdom has actually been looked up quite a lot. so there's— actually been looked up quite a lot. so there's very stark contrast between _ so there's very stark contrast between on the one hand, the way in which _ between on the one hand, the way in which the _ between on the one hand, the way in which the uk is being perceived in the context of this war and the way in which _ the context of this war and the way in which this particular prime minister— in which this particular prime minister in the context of partygate is revealing himself to be. the reason i ask _ is revealing himself to be. the reason i ask that _ is revealing himself to be. the reason i ask that is, _ is revealing himself to be. tie: reason i ask that is, let's is revealing himself to be. tte: reason i ask that is, let's face is revealing himself to be. tt9 reason i ask that is, let's face it, you represented a man who had an eccentricity with the truth. and i wonder what it does to a politician — you've advised borisjohnson, does credibility start to bleed away? tia. credibility start to bleed away? no. actions ultimately matter more than anything _ actions ultimately matter more than anything else, — actions ultimately matter more than anything else, and _ actions ultimately matter more than anything else, and i— actions ultimately matter more than anything else, and i think— actions ultimately matter more than anything else, and i think that's- anything else, and i think that's what _
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anything else, and i think that's what president _ anything else, and i think that's what president trump - anything else, and i think that's what president trump did, - anything else, and i think that's what president trump did, his i what president trump did, his actions — what president trump did, his actions demonstrated - what president trump did, his actions demonstrated his - actions demonstrated his credibility. the _ actions demonstrated his credibility. the problem. actions demonstrated his - credibility. the problem johnson actions demonstrated his _ credibility. the problem johnson has is not _ credibility. the problem johnson has is not necessarily— credibility. the problem johnson has is not necessarily embellishing - credibility. the problem johnson has is not necessarily embellishing the l is not necessarily embellishing the truth or— is not necessarily embellishing the truth or interpreting _ is not necessarily embellishing the truth or interpreting facts - truth or interpreting facts differently, _ truth or interpreting facts differently, it's— truth or interpreting facts differently, it's the - truth or interpreting facts - differently, it's the hypocrisy. ruies — differently, it's the hypocrisy. rules for— differently, it's the hypocrisy. rules for the, _ differently, it's the hypocrisy. rules for the, not _ differently, it's the hypocrisy. rules for the, not for - differently, it's the hypocrisy. rules for the, not for me. - differently, it's the hypocrisy. j rules for the, not for me. it's differently, it's the hypocrisy. l rules for the, not for me. it's a fraternity— rules for the, not for me. it's a fraternity house _ rules for the, not for me. it's a fraternity house there, - rules for the, not for me. it's a fraternity house there, and - rules for the, not for me. it's a fraternity house there, and why everyone — fraternity house there, and why everyone else _ fraternity house there, and why everyone else was _ fraternity house there, and why everyone else was locked - fraternity house there, and why everyone else was locked in - fraternity house there, and why . everyone else was locked in under the strict — everyone else was locked in under the strict rules, _ everyone else was locked in under the strict rules, he _ everyone else was locked in under the strict rules, he had _ everyone else was locked in under the strict rules, he had his - everyone else was locked in under the strict rules, he had his own. everyone else was locked in underl the strict rules, he had his own set of rules _ the strict rules, he had his own set of rules thats— the strict rules, he had his own set of rules. that's his _ the strict rules, he had his own set of rules. that's his problem, - the strict rules, he had his own set of rules. that's his problem, it's. of rules. that's his problem, it's not the — of rules. that's his problem, it's not the tying. _ of rules. that's his problem, it's not the tying. i _ of rules. that's his problem, it's not the lying, i think— of rules. that's his problem, it's not the lying, i think all- not the lying, i think all europeans, _ not the lying, i think all europeans, if— not the lying, i think all europeans, if you - not the lying, i think all europeans, if you ask. not the lying, i think all- europeans, if you ask them if not the lying, i think all— europeans, if you ask them if their boiiticians — europeans, if you ask them if their politicians embellish— europeans, if you ask them if their politicians embellish the _ europeans, if you ask them if their politicians embellish the truth - europeans, if you ask them if theirl politicians embellish the truth from time to— politicians embellish the truth from time to time, — politicians embellish the truth from time to time, they'd _ politicians embellish the truth from time to time, they'd say— politicians embellish the truth from time to time, they'd say yes, - politicians embellish the truth from time to time, they'd say yes, but. time to time, they'd say yes, but they— time to time, they'd say yes, but they wouldn't _ time to time, they'd say yes, but they wouldn't say— time to time, they'd say yes, but they wouldn't say they _ time to time, they'd say yes, but they wouldn't say they are - time to time, they'd say yes, but they wouldn't say they are so - they wouldn't say they are so hypocriticai _ they wouldn't say they are so hypocritical to _ they wouldn't say they are so hypocritical to their - they wouldn't say they are so hypocritical to their faces - they wouldn't say they are so . hypocritical to their faces where they pass — hypocritical to their faces where they pass laws _ hypocritical to their faces where they pass laws or— hypocritical to their faces where they pass laws or their - hypocritical to their faces where they pass laws or their stock . hypocritical to their faces where they pass laws or their stock inl they pass laws or their stock in their— they pass laws or their stock in their homes— they pass laws or their stock in their homes whilst _ they pass laws or their stock in their homes whilst they - they pass laws or their stock in their homes whilst they throwl their homes whilst they throw fraternity— their homes whilst they throw fraternity style _ their homes whilst they throw fraternity style parties - their homes whilst they throw fraternity style parties and . their homes whilst they throw. fraternity style parties and their offices — fraternity style parties and their offices at — fraternity style parties and their offices at 4pm. _ fraternity style parties and their offices at 4pm.— fraternity style parties and their offices at 4pm. there's been some comment this _ offices at 4pm. there's been some comment this week _ offices at 4pm. there's been some comment this week in _ offices at 4pm. there's been some comment this week in the - offices at 4pm. there's been some comment this week in the context | offices at 4pm. there's been some i comment this week in the context of what the prime minister said to the house and the explanations he's given — which of course is now coming to bite him — did they handle
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it the right way at the beginning? no, listen, the key to any crisis is you come — no, listen, the key to any crisis is you come out— no, listen, the key to any crisis is you come out with _ no, listen, the key to any crisis is you come out with as _ no, listen, the key to any crisis is you come out with as much - you come out with as much information— you come out with as much information as _ you come out with as much information as fast - you come out with as much information as fast as - you come out with as much . information as fast as possible you come out with as much - information as fast as possible so there's— information as fast as possible so there's no— information as fast as possible so there's no drip, _ information as fast as possible so there's no drip, drip, _ information as fast as possible so there's no drip, drip, drip. - information as fast as possible so there's no drip, drip, drip. what. there's no drip, drip, drip. what weye— there's no drip, drip, drip. what we've seen— there's no drip, drip, drip. what we've seen over— there's no drip, drip, drip. what we've seen over the _ there's no drip, drip, drip. what we've seen over the past - there's no drip, drip, drip. whatl we've seen over the past several months — we've seen over the past several months is — we've seen over the past several months is a _ we've seen over the past several months is a drip, _ we've seen over the past several months is a drip, drip, _ we've seen over the past several months is a drip, drip, drip, - we've seen over the past several months is a drip, drip, drip, it. months is a drip, drip, drip, it makes— months is a drip, drip, drip, it makes you— months is a drip, drip, drip, it makes you wonder— months is a drip, drip, drip, it makes you wonder what's - months is a drip, drip, drip, it. makes you wonder what's coming months is a drip, drip, drip, it- makes you wonder what's coming next. ithink— makes you wonder what's coming next. i think the _ makes you wonder what's coming next. i think the full— makes you wonder what's coming next. i think the full disclosures _ makes you wonder what's coming next. i think the full disclosures are - i think the full disclosures are what's — i think the full disclosures are what's brutalising _ i think the full disclosures are what's brutalising him, - i think the full disclosures are what's brutalising him, you i i think the full disclosures are i what's brutalising him, you learn from _ what's brutalising him, you learn from the — what's brutalising him, you learn from the clinton _ what's brutalising him, you learn from the clinton where _ what's brutalising him, you learn from the clinton where were - what's brutalising him, you learn| from the clinton where were they stopped — from the clinton where were they stopped the — from the clinton where were they stopped the drip, _ from the clinton where were they stopped the drip, drip, _ from the clinton where were they stopped the drip, drip, drip- from the clinton where were they stopped the drip, drip, drip of- stopped the drip, drip, drip of communications. _ stopped the drip, drip, drip of communications. this - stopped the drip, drip, drip of| communications. thisjohnson communications. this johnson ministration— communications. this johnson ministration has— communications. thisjohnson ministration has failed - communications. thisjohnson ministration has failed at - ministration has failed at containing _ ministration has failed at containing that _ ministration has failed at containing that drip. - ministration has failed at containing that drip. ministration has failed at containin: that dri. , ., ,, containing that drip. some breaking news, rim containing that drip. some breaking news. grim news — containing that drip. some breaking news, grim news that's _ containing that drip. some breaking news, grim news that's coming - containing that drip. some breaking news, grim news that's coming in l news, grim news that's coming in from texas, we are hearing that two children have been killed and 1a have been injured in a shooting at an elementary school. we don't have any more information on that at the moment, no pictures to bring you from the scene either. brian, on the back of what we reporting last week
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from buffalo and the killing of ten black people at a grocery store... despair again black people at a grocery store... despairagain i black people at a grocery store... despair again i guess in america, that these mass shootings keep occurring. that these mass shootings keep occurrina. �* :, that these mass shootings keep occurring.- can _ that these mass shootings keep occurring.- can you - that these mass shootings keep occurring.- can you hear. that these mass shootings keep occurring. brian. can you hear me? that these mass shootings keep occurring.- can you hear me? occurring. brian, can you hear me? i can hearyou _ occurring. brian, can you hear me? i can hearyou is— occurring. brian, can you hear me? i can hear you is a — occurring. brian, can you hear me? i can hear you. is a saying _ occurring. brian, can you hear me? i can hear you. is a saying in - occurring. brian, can you hear me? i can hear you. is a saying in light - can hear you. is a saying in light of buffalo _ can hear you. is a saying in light of buffalo last _ can hear you. is a saying in light of buffalo last week, _ can hear you. is a saying in light of buffalo last week, this - can hear you. is a saying in light of buffalo last week, this is - can hear you. is a saying in light of buffalo last week, this isjust| of buffalo last week, this is just devastating stock and we have to find a solution fast, there's too many things that are happening right now that just = many things that are happening right now that 'us . , many things that are happening right now that “usr , ., :, many things that are happening right now that 'us| , ., :, now that 'ust - they have to call find now thatjust - they have to call find something. _ now thatjust - they have to call find something. we _ now thatjust - they have to call find something. we need - now thatjust - they have to call find something. we need to - now thatjust - they have to call find something. we need to do| find something. we need to do something to _ find something. we need to do something to stop _ find something. we need to do something to stop it _ find something. we need to do something to stop it fast. - find something. we need to do something to stop it fast. me i find something. we need to do something to stop it fast. we will come back _ something to stop it fast. we will come back to _ something to stop it fast. we will come back to that _ something to stop it fast. we will come back to that because - something to stop it fast. we will| come back to that because clearly there's a lot of information we don't know at this moment, but when we get it we will bring it to you. successive polls tell you that, while the british public do care about what happened in number ten during lockdown, they care an awful lot more about the rising cost of living. and with downing street and the treasury still at odds over
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how to help those struggling with their bills, some grim news from the energy regulator 0fgem. the price cap — which sets a limit on the maximum amount suppliers can charge — is to rise again in october. right now, the cap is £1,971. here's 0fgems' chief executive johnathan bearley confirming the new cap, earlier today. we are expecting a price cap in october in the region of £2800. that's an increase of more than £800, on the back of the £700 rise in april. the poorest will be hit hardest, but notjust the poor. those who will fall into fuel poverty come 0ctober — that is is those who spend 10% of their income on fuel — will double to 12 million households. that's around 40% of the households in the country — and according tojonathan brearley, it could get worse. we are really managing between two
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extreme versions _ we are really managing between two extreme versions of _ we are really managing between two extreme versions of events. - we are really managing between two extreme versions of events. one, . extreme versions of events. one, where the price falls back to where it was before, for example,... 0ne it was before, for example,... one where prices could go even further if we were to see, for example, an interruption from gas from russia. tonight, the bbc understands that a government scheme to help support people with the cost of living could come as soon as thursday. let's bring in luke tryl — he is uk director of more in common, a group working to counter polarisation. welcome to the programme. speaking of polarisation, there is a huge risk here with the cost of ever upwards, there is a deep wedge driven into society with the poor gary, are getting poorer and the rich managing or even getting richer so i feel absolutely, thank you for having me on tonight. we spend our time talking to the public outside of the westminster bubble to find out how they are interpreting events
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in the news. out how they are interpreting events in the news-— out how they are interpreting events inthenews. :, �*, , ., in the news. what's become a parent and our focus — in the news. what's become a parent and our focus groups, _ in the news. what's become a parent and our focus groups, particularly - and ourfocus groups, particularly over the past couple months, is quite how much the rising cost of living is hitting families up and down the country. we did a focus group in wakefield on thursday where we heard people who were being forced to sell the family home because they couldn't afford to heat it, a father was trying to take on a second job over the weekend so he can afford to feed his family, a mother who was fighting with her son's school to make sure he got his free school meals. so these really heart—wrenching stories — and what's even more devastating for the country is it's notjust the poorest suffering now, as you said, there are even more people being sucked into this fuel poverty where they feel that they're having to make these choices about, do they turn these choices about, do they turn the heating on or do the weekly shop, orfill up the car? that's
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creating this resentment being fuelled by this lack of action that we've seen today from politicians in westminster. i we've seen today from politicians in westminster-— westminster. i said at the outset that people _ westminster. i said at the outset that people clearly _ westminster. i said at the outset that people clearly care - westminster. i said at the outset that people clearly care more - westminster. i said at the outset i that people clearly care more about this issue than they do about the parties two years ago. but is there a risk, as far as you're concerned, that somehow these two stories become entangled?— that somehow these two stories become entangled? absolutely, it's not a risk, people _ become entangled? absolutely, it's not a risk, people are _ become entangled? absolutely, it's not a risk, people are already - not a risk, people are already making the links between the two. what you hear when you talk to people at focus groups is the sense of, how could these people who, when we were all in lockdown, making sacrifices, unable to say bye to love 1's going to be present for births or birthdays, operations, any of those — how could those people, when we were going through that, having these cheese and wine parties, now understand our struggles as we battle with this rise in the cost—of—living? clearly
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they are on a totally different planet, they are more interested in their partying and lifestyles then in helping ordinary people around the country. that is really toxic throughout politics because it gives the sense that we have people in charge, rightly or wrongly, whojust aren't in touch with what people are experiencing in their everyday lives. so they are absolutely not two separate stories for most people, two sides of the same coin which speak to a political class just not in touch with all people. natalie, listening to the off gem boss today, it's clear that these energy prices are closely plate to what happens in ukraine. timer;r what happens in ukraine. they absurdly are. _ what happens in ukraine. they absurdly are, first _ what happens in ukraine. they absurdly are, first and - what happens in ukraine. they absurdly are, first and flexion connected to the rising inequalities is that, _ connected to the rising inequalities is that, in— connected to the rising inequalities is that, in a — connected to the rising inequalities is that, in a sense, this is the last— is that, in a sense, this is the last of— is that, in a sense, this is the last of a — is that, in a sense, this is the last of a series of crises, beginning with the global financial
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crisis _ beginning with the global financial crisis and — beginning with the global financial crisis and the pandemic, now the war in ukraine _ crisis and the pandemic, now the war in ukraine - — crisis and the pandemic, now the war in ukraine — each one of these crises — in ukraine — each one of these crises led _ in ukraine — each one of these crises led to growing inequalities. now i_ crises led to growing inequalities. now i think there's been a clear connection— now i think there's been a clear connection between the transition from _ connection between the transition from the — connection between the transition from the pandemic to the war in ukraine — from the pandemic to the war in ukraine. the manner in which the pandemic— ukraine. the manner in which the pandemic looked like it was easing, demand picked up at supply did not, ieading _ demand picked up at supply did not, leading to _ demand picked up at supply did not, leading to higher energy prices. this was— leading to higher energy prices. this was taking place prior to the war, _ this was taking place prior to the war. it _ this was taking place prior to the war. it is — this was taking place prior to the war, it is not a coincidence that vladimir— war, it is not a coincidence that vladimir putin decided to wage war on ukraine — vladimir putin decided to wage war on ukraine when he did precisely as the time _ on ukraine when he did precisely as the time when his bargaining power was increasing. the invasion starts in ukraine, — was increasing. the invasion starts in ukraine, and now what we are seeing— in ukraine, and now what we are seeing is— in ukraine, and now what we are seeing is energy prices, which are completely disconnected from market realities _ completely disconnected from market realities. this is the case of a massive _ realities. this is the case of a massive market failure. i think the question— massive market failure. i think the question we should be asking ourselves, which is also connected to it what — ourselves, which is also connected to it what kind of sanctions will
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serve _ to it what kind of sanctions will serve the — to it what kind of sanctions will serve the purpose of weakening russia, — serve the purpose of weakening russia, punishing russia without ourselves— russia, punishing russia without ourselves is bringing in the conversation, when we talk about on the one _ conversation, when we talk about on the one hand, the option of an embargo, _ the one hand, the option of an embargo, but on the other hand, is it not— embargo, but on the other hand, is it not perhaps wiser to think in terms — it not perhaps wiser to think in terms of— it not perhaps wiser to think in terms of energy price caps, which would _ terms of energy price caps, which would obviously need to work alongside the use of us secretary sanctions? the alongside the use of us secretary sanctions? :, , ~ , sanctions? the polish prime minister went further— sanctions? the polish prime minister went further than _ sanctions? the polish prime minister went further than natalie _ sanctions? the polish prime minister went further than natalie today, - went further than natalie today, confirmed vladimir putin's tactics blocking off the black sea port to whatjosef stalin did in the 1930s, saying that when men do like her millions die in a man—made famine. you think people in america understand what putin is doing and how far he'll go? i understand what putin is doing and how far he'll go?— how far he'll go? i think we do. we don't know— how far he'll go? i think we do. we don't know how _ how far he'll go? i think we do. we don't know how far _ how far he'll go? i think we do. we don't know how far they'll - how far he'll go? i think we do. we don't know how far they'll go, - don't know how far they'll go, but we certainly— don't know how far they'll go, but we certainly understand _ don't know how far they'll go, but we certainly understand what's i we certainly understand what's happening _ we certainly understand what's happening it's— we certainly understand what's happening. it's hard _ we certainly understand what's happening. it's hard to - we certainly understand what's happening. it's hard to ignorel we certainly understand what's. happening. it's hard to ignore in our news — happening. it's hard to ignore in our news and _ happening. it's hard to ignore in our news and coverage, - happening. it's hard to ignore in our news and coverage, our- happening. it's hard to ignore in. our news and coverage, our politics is talk— our news and coverage, our politics is talk about — our news and coverage, our politics is talk about it, _ our news and coverage, our politics is talk about it, even _ our news and coverage, our politics is talk about it, even culturally- is talk about it, even culturally it's bleeding _ is talk about it, even culturally it's bleeding into— is talk about it, even culturally it's bleeding into our— is talk about it, even culturally it's bleeding into our daily- it's bleeding into our daily cultural— it's bleeding into our daily cultural lives. _
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it's bleeding into our daily cultural lives. so- it's bleeding into our daily cultural lives. so it's - it's bleeding into our daily. cultural lives. so it's critical that— cultural lives. so it's critical that we _ cultural lives. so it's critical that we tell— cultural lives. so it's critical that we tell the _ cultural lives. so it's critical that we tell the public - cultural lives. so it's critical that we tell the public of. cultural lives. so it's critical. that we tell the public of why it matters — that we tell the public of why it matters. i think— that we tell the public of why it matters. i think there's - that we tell the public of why it matters. i think there's been. that we tell the public of why it matters. i think there's been a| that we tell the public of why it - matters. i think there's been a gap here in the — matters. i think there's been a gap here in the united _ matters. i think there's been a gap here in the united states - matters. i think there's been a gap here in the united states of- matters. i think there's been a gap here in the united states of why. here in the united states of why ukraine — here in the united states of why ukraine matters. _ here in the united states of why ukraine matters. it _ here in the united states of why ukraine matters. it matters - ukraine matters. it matters economically, _ ukraine matters. it matters economically, with - ukraine matters. it matters economically, with respectl ukraine matters. it matters i economically, with respect to energy. — economically, with respect to energy. it _ economically, with respect to energy, it matters _ economically, with respect to . energy, it matters agriculturally. and i_ energy, it matters agriculturally. ana r think— energy, it matters agriculturally. and i think there's _ energy, it matters agriculturally. and i think there's a _ energy, it matters agriculturally. and i think there's a gap- energy, it matters agriculturally. and i think there's a gap here . energy, it matters agriculturally. and i think there's a gap here inl and i think there's a gap here in the us— and i think there's a gap here in the us of— and i think there's a gap here in the us of why— and i think there's a gap here in the us of why we _ and i think there's a gap here in the us of why we invest - and i think there's a gap here in the us of why we invest so - and i think there's a gap here ml the us of why we invest so much money— the us of why we invest so much money into— the us of why we invest so much money into protecting _ the us of why we invest so much money into protecting and - the us of why we invest so much i money into protecting and sending weapons _ money into protecting and sending weapons to— money into protecting and sending weapons to ukraine— _ money into protecting and sending weapons to ukraine— you - money into protecting and sending weapons to ukraine— you saw- money into protecting and sending weapons to ukraine— you saw that| weapons to ukraine— you saw that reflected — weapons to ukraine— you saw that reflected in— weapons to ukraine— you saw that reflected in the _ weapons to ukraine— you saw that reflected in the last _ weapons to ukraine— you saw that reflected in the last economic- reflected in the last economic package — reflected in the last economic package sent _ reflected in the last economic package sent to _ reflected in the last economic package sent to ukraine, - reflected in the last economic package sent to ukraine, you| reflected in the last economic- package sent to ukraine, you had more _ package sent to ukraine, you had more and — package sent to ukraine, you had more and more _ package sent to ukraine, you had more and more republican- package sent to ukraine, you had - more and more republican opposition. youti— more and more republican opposition. you'll have _ more and more republican opposition. you'll have more — more and more republican opposition. you'll have more republican— you'll have more republican opposition— you'll have more republican opposition coming _ you'll have more republican opposition coming forward i you'll have more republican. opposition coming forward after hearing — opposition coming forward after hearing what _ opposition coming forward after hearing what doctor _ opposition coming forward after hearing what doctor kissinger. opposition coming forward after. hearing what doctor kissingerjust said in doorposts, _ hearing what doctor kissingerjust said in doorposts, the _ hearing what doctor kissingerjust said in doorposts, the west- hearing what doctor kissingerjustl said in doorposts, the west should stop arming — said in doorposts, the west should stop arming ukraine _ said in doorposts, the west should stop arming ukraine and _ said in doorposts, the west should stop arming ukraine and force - said in doorposts, the west should stop arming ukraine and force a i stop arming ukraine and force a settlement. you'll— stop arming ukraine and force a settlement. you'll get more - stop arming ukraine and force a - settlement. you'll get more and more and it's— settlement. you'll get more and more and it's certainly— settlement. you'll get more and more and it's certainly a _ settlement. you'll get more and more and it's certainly a scary— settlement. you'll get more and more and it's certainly a scary time. - settlement. you'll get more and more and it's certainly a scary time. at- and it's certainly a scary time. at the gap — and it's certainly a scary time. at the gap needs— and it's certainly a scary time. at the gap needs to _ and it's certainly a scary time. at the gap needs to be _ and it's certainly a scary time. at the gap needs to be filled - and it's certainly a scary time. at the gap needs to be filled by- the gap needs to be filled by ieadership— the gap needs to be filled by leadership on— the gap needs to be filled by leadership on this _ the gap needs to be filled by leadership on this issue - the gap needs to be filled by leadership on this issue so. the gap needs to be filled by. leadership on this issue so the americans— leadership on this issue so the americans fully— leadership on this issue so the americans fully understand . leadership on this issue so the . americans fully understand what ukraine — americans fully understand what ukraine needs _ americans fully understand what ukraine needs and _ americans fully understand what ukraine needs and hopefully- americans fully understand what ukraine needs and hopefully get| ukraine needs and hopefully get invested — ukraine needs and hopefully get invested in— ukraine needs and hopefully get invested in protecting. - ukraine needs and hopefully get invested in protecting.— invested in protecting. finally, luke, invested in protecting. finally, luke. what _ invested in protecting. finally, luke, what about _ invested in protecting. finally, luke, what about people - invested in protecting. finally, luke, what about people in - invested in protecting. finally, | luke, what about people in the invested in protecting. finally, - luke, what about people in the uk? who do they think is to blame for the rising prices?—
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who do they think is to blame for the rising prices? people understand that the rising _ the rising prices? people understand that the rising prices _ the rising prices? people understand that the rising prices are _ the rising prices? people understand that the rising prices are caused - the rising prices? people understand that the rising prices are caused by i that the rising prices are caused by many things you just talked about, the opening up post pandemic, the invasion of ukraine, they are very proud of britain's response to the invasion of ukraine. but they are less concerned about what's causing these process rises —— price rises and want action to help mitigate it, particularly action directed at the most vulnerable. people recognise that everyone will suffer and struggle a little bit through that, but what they want to ensure that those who are really suffering, those who are really suffering, those economically insecure, struggling to feed their kids, that they are getting the support they need. so for most people it's just not about courses, but what we do about it. :, ., , not about courses, but what we do about it. :, :, , . about it. lou, thanks very much indeed for _ about it. lou, thanks very much indeed for that, _ about it. lou, thanks very much indeed for that, good _ about it. lou, thanks very much indeed for that, good to - about it. lou, thanks very much indeed for that, good to see - about it. lou, thanks very much | indeed for that, good to see you this evening. —— luke. isaid i'd bring you more information on this
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shooting in texas. does make children dead, a dozen injured in the texas on your school shooting. we just had the texas on your school shooting. wejust had more information on the texas on your school shooting. we just had more information on this from the school district 85 miles west of the city of san antonio — they are saying, and you're seeing life pictures at the moment, students have been evacuated from the school this morning. a suspect was cornered by the authorities and police later tweeted that he was in custody. neither local police nor school districts have confirmed reports by cbs that a teacher was among those shot. but hospitals have disclosed that there are students being treated by emergency services. a66—year—old woman is being treated in a hospital in san antonio and is in a hospital in san antonio and is in critical condition —— a 66—year—old. that community of
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66,000, that school was due to graduate on friday. emergency services are currently taking people away. we will bring you reaction from that as and when we get it. thousands of photos and documents that were hacked from police servers in china have revealed the true extent of the communist party's highly secretive incarceration of uyghurs and ethnic minorities. the data — referred to as the "xinjiang police files" — was passed to 12 media organisation including the bbc. it details evidence of a shoot—to—kill policy that targeted anyone trying to escape and it documents the personal records of 23,000 detainees. the oldest is 73. here'sjohn sudworth. camera shutter click these are the faces china never intended us to see from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it is running detention camps for uighurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools
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for willing students. the photos, almost 3,000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uighur society have been swept up person by person. the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention, the youngest just 15. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uighurs en masse. just for growing a beard, this person was sentenced to 16 years injail — his chosen expression of uighur identity forcibly removed.
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this man knew his eldest son had been jailed, this man knew his eldest son had beenjailed, but this man knew his eldest son had been jailed, but the database tells him for how long — 15 years for terrorism offences. although as evidence, only his son's develop faith is listed. in response, the chinese government told the bbc that it enacted "de—radicalisation measures" in xinjiang to deal with a "complex counter—terrorism situation". lets bring in isabel hilton — a journalist who has reported extensively from china and hong kong. she founded the china dialogue, and she's here in london. 0ne one of the things that really stands out to me beyond these images is the instructions given to police — there are instructions here to shoot on sight people who tried to escape. with tripod mounted machine guns. indeed, this hardly sounds like a voluntary exercise on part of the inmates. it makes one wonder what the british police training, which has been conducted and funded by the taxpayer under borisjohnson's taxpayer under boris johnson's government, has
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taxpayer under borisjohnson's government, has been teaching the chinese police — clearly not good counterterrorism tactics. band chinese police - clearly not good counterterrorism tactics. and other im ortant counterterrorism tactics. and other important document _ counterterrorism tactics. and other important document is _ counterterrorism tactics. and other important document is this - counterterrorism tactics. and other important document is this speech | important document is this speech from a high rated official that appears to link xi jinping directly to this policy. not only does he know about it, but the speech suggests he is handing down instructions to build more camps. is that significant to you? i instructions to build more camps. is that significant to you?— that significant to you? i think there's little _ that significant to you? i think there's little doubt _ that significant to you? i think there's little doubt that - that significant to you? i think there's little doubt that this i there's little doubt that this policy comes from the top. we've seen the chinese approach to security become more and more authoritarian and draconian, we've seen and notjust in xinjiang, but in hong kong. that doesn't happen in a state like china without positive endorsement from the top. i a state like china without positive endorsement from the top. i read this today. _ endorsement from the top. i read this today. and — endorsement from the top. i read this today, and what _ endorsement from the top. i read this today, and what is _ endorsement from the top. i read this today, and what is shocking i endorsement from the top. i read | this today, and what is shocking to me is the silence from muslim countries, from the governments of muslim countries. it's been a deafening silence and it speaks to china's ability to leverage its
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economic power, it has powerful economic power, it has powerful economic relations with saudi arabia, with countries that position themselves as defenders of islam. the people of xinjiang are mostly not sunni, but they are also muslims, and it's remarkable how little has been said, how little complaint we've heard from those countries. , ~ , :, ~ , countries. only turkey - and turkey not that strongly, _ countries. only turkey - and turkey not that strongly, but _ countries. only turkey - and turkey not that strongly, but they - countries. only turkey - and turkey not that strongly, but they have . not that strongly, but they have from time to time raised concerns. natalie, you've got experience with this, having worked for the foreign representative in europe. do you think the un observer should have gone given its a highly staged visit? t gone given it's a highly staged visit? :, :, , , :, visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has _ visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has been _ visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has been in _ visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has been in the - visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has been in the air- visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has been in the air for. visit? i mean, the whole issue of her visit has been in the air for a | her visit has been in the air for a while so— her visit has been in the air for a while so on— her visit has been in the air for a while. so on the one hand, the visit
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is actually— while. so on the one hand, the visit is actually finally taking place, that significant. but i was thinking on the _ that significant. but i was thinking on the point you are making, which i think— on the point you are making, which i think is— on the point you are making, which i think is really important — we are having _ think is really important — we are having a — think is really important — we are having a conversation about why is it that _ having a conversation about why is it that many muslim countries have actually _ it that many muslim countries have actually not reacted. the thought that came — actually not reacted. the thought that came to my mind was that it really— that came to my mind was that it really does feel like, as we exit a phase _ really does feel like, as we exit a phase in — really does feel like, as we exit a phase in international politics which — phase in international politics which was really determined by issues — which was really determined by issues like culture and civilisation, and religion, which had all— civilisation, and religion, which had all the _ civilisation, and religion, which had all the distortions attached to that phase, now we are in a phase where _ that phase, now we are in a phase where the — that phase, now we are in a phase where the international system does seem _ where the international system does seem to _ where the international system does seem to be — where the international system does seem to be divided in terms of what kind of— seem to be divided in terms of what kind of political systems, essentially, to put it in shorthand, democracy— essentially, to put it in shorthand, democracy versus autocracy. and many of these _ democracy versus autocracy. and many of these muslim countries in the gulf are — of these muslim countries in the gulf are very much autocracies. so in that— gulf are very much autocracies. so in that respect, it's not as surprising as it may initially look. we are _ surprising as it may initially look. we are out— surprising as it may initially look. we are out of time, thank you very much for your thoughts, isabel.
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coming up — we are going to talk to the former cia case officer, about a mole within the cia. stay with us. hello there. we saw plenty of showers today, some of them more heavy with hail and thunder, particularly across parts of england and wales. but the shower activity is easing down now. in fact, many places will be drier overnight, but we've got more rain pushing into northern and western areas thanks to a new frontal system you can see behind me making inroads off the atlantic. it'll start to bring some wetter, windier weather to western scotland, northern ireland, western england and wales by the end of the night. it'll be dry, though, with clearer spells further east. so under the clearer spells, we could see temperatures dipping into single digits, but further west, generally, where we have the cloud, the wind and the rain, it'll be pretty mild. so this weather front will continue to push its way eastwards across the country on wednesday, weakening as it does so. more isobars on the charts tomorrow, so it means it's going to be a windy day pretty much across the board, but very windy across the north
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and west of scotland. but the front will be fizzling out as it pushes south eastwards, but behind it, it'll brighten up, plenty of sunshine around, but further blustery showers, most of them in the north and west of scotland. temperatures range from the mid to high teens. factor in the wind, though, it might not feel as mild as that. as we head through wednesday night, it'll be turning a little bit drier and clear once again thanks to another ridge of high pressure, but another feature will be pushing into western areas, bringing some wet weather to northern ireland by the end of the night. temperatures, single digits in the north, double figures across the south. we got low pressure to the north of the uk, higher pressure to the south for thursday. this little feature running through central areas will bring outbreaks of showery rain. that'll be pushing across the irish sea, into northern and central england, into wales, eventually clearing away, but there will be, i think, quite a bit of cloud around generally for england and wales on thursday, a few showers here and there. brighterfurther north, sunshine and showers across scotland. temperatures mid teens in the north. we could see 19 or 20 in the south. now, for friday, high pressure in the south starts to push northwards.
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that'll settle things down, but still the northeast of the country, especially much of northern scotland, will be windy with further blustery showers here, a few sunny spells. but elsewhere, northern ireland, most of england and wales will be drier on friday, increasing amounts of sunshine, so it'll feel a bit warmer, i think. high teens, low 20s here, but mid teens further north and feeling cooler because of the wind. into the weekend, high pressure continues to bring a lot of dry and settled weather around, quite a bit of sunshine, but we start to pick up our winds from a more northerly direction, so that means it'll start to feel cool in the north and east.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. a former cia operative says a russian spy rose to the highest ranks of us intelligence. for the first time, robert baer tells the story of the hunt of the "fourth man", a russian mole who aided putin's rise to power. we'll speak to him live. breaking news, two children killed at a school shooting in texas with another 13 injured. and all eyes on the georgia primaries — it's a big night for the gop and for donald trump. we will take you through some of the highlights around the country. tonight with the context, former eu foreign policy adviser nathalie tocci and bryan lanza, a former trump communications director.
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welcome back to the programme. during the 1980s, in the final years of the cold war, the americans arrested three double agents who were spying for the soviet union — cia officers edward lee howard and aldrich ames and fbi agent robert hanssen. for years, the three men had been feeding information to moscow that had compromised soviet secret agents who were spying for the united states. ames and hanssen are still serving time in federal prisons. howard defected to moscow, where he died in 2002. but was there another? according to a new book, a mole hunt for the "fourth man" who was suspected of being a cia officer began in the 1990s, but no—one has ever been arrested or charged in the case. now secret details of that investigation are being disclosed for the first time in the fourth man, a new book by former cia officer
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robert baer, who is with us. welcome to the programme. do you think there was another mole? absolutely. when i first heard the story, four years ago, i checked it out with the fbi and cia and everybody has no doubt there was a fourth man. and as well he did more damage than the other three moles put together. they don't where the losses were in my 98, the cia had no informants in moscow or anywhere in the world. :, :, , :, informants in moscow or anywhere in the world. :, :, ~ :, ., the world. how do you know that it was him or— the world. how do you know that it was him or this _ the world. how do you know that it was him or this fourth _ the world. how do you know that it was him or this fourth figure that i was him or this fourth figure that you cannot find?— was him or this fourth figure that you cannot find? well, i have talked to all the investigators _ you cannot find? well, i have talked to all the investigators and - you cannot find? well, i have talked to all the investigators and in - to all the investigators and in fact when i was in the cia, part of the mole hunting team was hidden in my session, had no idea what they were doing. they came to me like i said four years ago and explained to me what the mole hunt was about and
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said we cannot let this go, the man is still alive. i took their facts and read it by the fbi. they agreed and read it by the fbi. they agreed and the problem is he did not take money and he did not pass documents. he met in london often with the kgb on official supposedly business across europe. and what happened with the fbi is there were two russian defectors came out who had identified him, but then there was no probative evidence to taking the court. d0 no probative evidence to taking the court. , :, no probative evidence to taking the court. ,, ~' no probative evidence to taking the court. i. ~ ., no probative evidence to taking the court. i. ,, ., .,, court. do you think that there was somethin: court. do you think that there was something this _ court. do you think that there was something this particular- court. do you think that there was something this particular fourth i court. do you think that there was i something this particular fourth man something this particularfourth man was doing that kept him ahead of your mole hunting team? exactly, it's tinker tailor _ your mole hunting team? exactly, it's tinker tailor soldier _ your mole hunting team? exactly, it's tinker tailor soldier spy - your mole hunting team? exactly, it's tinker tailor soldier spy and i it's tinker tailor soldier spy and the problem is that george smiley was the mole in the american case. so he was working with the fbi and counterintelligence, worked in
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counterintelligence, worked in counterintelligence and knew every lead the fbi had commemorated the cia had and threw up a smoke screen and had red herrings and people said oh that's the fourth man. they investigated him for many years and it was really truly a brilliant game. it was really truly a brilliant came. :, , :, :, it was really truly a brilliant tame, :, , :, :, y:, “ game. how senior do you think he was? he was— game. how senior do you think he was? he was right _ game. how senior do you think he was? he was right at _ game. how senior do you think he was? he was right at the - game. how senior do you think he was? he was right at the top. - was? he was right at the top. associate _ was? he was right at the top. associate director _ was? he was right at the top. associate director of - was? he was right at the top. associate director of the - was? he was right at the top. associate director of the cia. | was? he was right at the top. i associate director of the cia. he has been around forever. he controlled everything. and the fbi by the way it knows they were had over these years. 50 by the way it knows they were had over these years.— over these years. so what you were sa in: over these years. so what you were saying that — over these years. so what you were saying that is _ over these years. so what you were saying that is there _ over these years. so what you were saying that is there has _ over these years. so what you were saying that is there has never- over these years. so what you were saying that is there has never been | saying that is there has never been a better place to spy in the cia? the defector that came out, about ten years ago, said the kgb has never had a better agent and that includes the cambridge five. 50 includes the cambridge five. so let's bring that to the present day. why is this story so important? well, for one, he made sure that we
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missed vladimir putin's rise. he provided information to the kgb which was used to blackmail boris yeltsin, and it was conversations between boris yeltsin and bill clinton. the kgb under putin went to gelson is that we know is that we now examine what you are doing with the americans. back off and at that point boris yeltsin saw that the kgb had washington penetrated, including at the white house level. and he stopped talking to bill clinton. and that was it. and we had no input, no suggestions of who would replace boris yeltsin so 99, the fourth man helped pave the way for vladimir putin's rise. 50 helped pave the way for vladimir putin's rise-— putin's rise. so to be clear what ou are putin's rise. so to be clear what you are saying _ putin's rise. so to be clear what you are saying there _ putin's rise. so to be clear what you are saying there is - putin's rise. so to be clear what you are saying there is there i putin's rise. so to be clear what i you are saying there is there were top—secret files taken from white house discussions which were then fed directly to the kgb where of course vladimir putin was very senior quiz mac yes, it was the fsb, and he took these documents... eight
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took the summaries _ and he took these documents... e grit took the summaries and walked over took the summaries and walked over to boris yeltsin. the cia found this out and said we are in the white house. you cannot avoid us. you are going to... and vladimir putin got where he is essentially thanks to a coup d'etat. ask kgb hardliners, statists as they are called, and they were everywhere. who statists as they are called, and they were everywhere. who do you think placed _ they were everywhere. who do you think placed in _ they were everywhere. who do you think placed in there? _ they were everywhere. who do you think placed in there? do - they were everywhere. who do you think placed in there? do you - they were everywhere. who do you think placed in there? do you think it was later approved and put in there because he was so senior in the fsb? b, there because he was so senior in the fsb? �* :, ,. ., there because he was so senior in thefsb? ., , the fsb? a fascinating story, he walks in in _ the fsb? a fascinating story, he walks in in vienna _ the fsb? a fascinating story, he walks in in vienna and _ the fsb? a fascinating story, he i walks in in vienna and approaches what is called the second chief director of counterintelligence and says i don't trust the rest of the kgb in this is the fourth man and i want to go to moscow and i want to determine all the spy tradecraft and how this will work. no documents, as i said, no money. how this will work. no documents, as isaid, no money. i intend how this will work. no documents, as i said, no money. i intend to get away with this. and he essentially told the russians in so many words that he was in it for the game because everybody he worked with at the cia was an idiot and he was
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going to teach them a lesson. band going to teach them a lesson. and where is the _ going to teach them a lesson. and where is the investigation today, robert? you said that it was still ongoing. how alive is the investigation was meant to be think the fourth man is still alive? he is still alive- — the fourth man is still alive? he is still alive. the _ the fourth man is still alive? he is still alive. the fbi _ the fourth man is still alive? he is still alive. the fbi is _ the fourth man is still alive? he is still alive. the fbi is going - the fourth man is still alive? h9: 3 still alive. the fbi is going around as of three weeks ago knocking on the doors of my sources. not a leak investigation but to figure out if they missed anything. the file is sitting in the eastern district of federal court, the prosecutor. they are going through as we speak to make sure they did not miss anything, but as far as i know as of today they do not have enough for an indictment. but today they do not have enough for an indictment. �* :, , , indictment. but not still employed b the indictment. but not still employed by the cia. — indictment. but not still employed by the cia, retired? _ indictment. but not still employed by the cia, retired? he _ indictment. but not still employed by the cia, retired? he is - indictment. but not still employed by the cia, retired? he is retired i by the cia, retired? he is retired but the fbi _ by the cia, retired? he is retired but the fbi would _ by the cia, retired? he is retired but the fbi would really - by the cia, retired? he is retired but the fbi would really love - by the cia, retired? he is retired but the fbi would really love to i by the cia, retired? he is retired i but the fbi would really love to get a hold of him to see what he compromised, and there is an in my sick side of this as well. there was a russian spy in m16 was involved in an the fourth man was involved in and it is sort of a wide ranging and
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it was mi6 who first told the cia you are completely compromised. i did this in 1998. all of our assets are pulled out of moscow and around the world. ,, ., :, ., , the world. quite extraordinary. brian, the world. quite extraordinary. brian. are _ the world. quite extraordinary. brian. are you _ the world. quite extraordinary. brian, are you listening - the world. quite extraordinary. brian, are you listening to - the world. quite extraordinary. | brian, are you listening to this? have you ever heard anything quite like this, a russian agent right at the top of the cia? leaking secrets from the white house look like something from hollywood. it’s a something from hollywood. it's a movie i something from hollywood. it's a movie i saw _ something from hollywood. it's a movie i saw because _ something from hollywood. it's a movie i saw because no - something from hollywood. it's a movie i saw because no way - something from hollywood. it's a movie i saw because no way out with kevin costner in the late 805 is what it — kevin costner in the late 805 is what it feels like, where he was a military— what it feels like, where he was a military person who was ultimately a russian _ military person who was ultimately a russian 5py. thi5 military person who was ultimately a russian 5py. this is hollywood, ru55ian 5py. this is hollywood, unbelievable. russian spy. this is hollywood, unbelievable.— russian spy. this is hollywood, unbelievable. robert, you are a former case _ unbelievable. robert, you are a former case officer _ unbelievable. robert, you are a former case officer yourself. - unbelievable. robert, you are a former case officer yourself. do j unbelievable. robert, you are a - former case officer yourself. do you think we are returning to a cold war state where double agents are being placed inside the intelligence services and does that require a renewed focus from the us? we are back to the — renewed focus from the us? we are back to the cold _ renewed focus from the us? we are back to the cold war _ renewed focus from the us? we are back to the cold war at _ renewed focus from the us? we are back to the cold war at worst - renewed focus from the us? we are back to the cold war at worst at - back to the cold war at worst at this point. clearly with ukraine, it's a hot war in us is aiding,
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killing military officers for russia in this war. russians no doubt are all over europe, all over the us, putting out disinformation, they are doing everything they can. the war is back, and vladimir putin understands this very well, and he is going to reform russian intelligence. talk him into going to ukraine and he is furious as many have been fired reportedly. but yes the cold war is back on. that have been fired reportedly. but yes the cold war is back on.— the cold war is back on. that has serious applications _ the cold war is back on. that has serious applications for _ the cold war is back on. that has serious applications for european j serious applications for european security. i think there are still many people in government circles who think the cold war is behind us and maybe have turned an eye off this sort of spy craft and that was commonplace in the 1980s. you have worked in the highest echelons of european government. do you think there aware of this and highly attuned to it? i there aware of this and highly attuned to it?— there aware of this and highly attuned to it? ~ ., :, , attuned to it? i think we are only really beginning _ attuned to it? i think we are only
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really beginning to _ attuned to it? i think we are only really beginning to understand i really beginning to understand essentially~ _ really beginning to understand e55entially. only— really beginning to understand e55entially. 0nly really- really beginning to understand e55entially. 0nly really seen i really beginning to understand i e55entially. 0nly really seen the tip of— e55entially. 0nly really seen the tip of the — e55entially. 0nly really seen the tip of the iceberg _ e55entially. 0nly really seen the tip of the iceberg of— e55entially. 0nly really seen the tip of the iceberg of something i tip of the iceberg of something which — tip of the iceberg of something which has _ tip of the iceberg of something which has been _ tip of the iceberg of something which has been bubbling - tip of the iceberg of something which has been bubbling awayl tip of the iceberg of something i which has been bubbling away for years _ which has been bubbling away for years and — which has been bubbling away for years. and essentially— which has been bubbling away for years. and e55entially now- which has been bubbling away for years. and e55entially now awaitl which has been bubbling away for. years. and e55entially now await not only europeans _ years. and e55entially now await not only europeans but _ years. and e55entially now await not only europeans but i _ years. and e55entially now await not only europeans but i think— years. and e55entially now await not only europeans but i think to - years. and e55entially now await not only europeans but i think to an - only european5 but i think to an extent— only europeans but i think to an extent americans _ only europeans but i think to an extent americans were - only europeans but i think to an extent americans were sort - only europeans but i think to an extent americans were sort of. only europeans but i think to an - extent americans were sort of living in la land _ extent americans were sort of living in la land for— extent americans were sort of living in la land fora— extent americans were sort of living in la land for a long _ extent americans were sort of living in la land for a long time. _ extent americans were sort of living in la land for a long time. and - extent americans were sort of living in la land for a long time. and i- in la land for a long time. and i think— in la land for a long time. and i think the — in la land for a long time. and i think the tragedy— in la land for a long time. and i think the tragedy of— in la land for a long time. and i think the tragedy of this - in la land for a long time. and i think the tragedy of this is - in la land for a long time. and i think the tragedy of this is thatl think the tragedy of this is that this is— think the tragedy of this is that this is not actually— think the tragedy of this is that this is not actually a _ think the tragedy of this is that this is not actually a return - think the tragedy of this is that this is not actually a return to i think the tragedy of this is that i this is not actually a return to the cold war — this is not actually a return to the cold war we _ this is not actually a return to the cold war. we are _ this is not actually a return to the cold war. we are in a _ this is not actually a return to the cold war. we are in a hot- this is not actually a return to the cold war. we are in a hot war- this is not actually a return to the| cold war. we are in a hot war and this is not actually a return to the - cold war. we are in a hot war and we are in— cold war. we are in a hot war and we are ina hot— cold war. we are in a hot war and we are ina hot war— cold war. we are in a hot war and we are in a hot war so _ cold war. we are in a hot war and we are in a hot war so on _ cold war. we are in a hot war and we are in a hot war so on the _ cold war. we are in a hot war and we are in a hot war so on the one - cold war. we are in a hot war and we are in a hot war so on the one hand i are in a hot war so on the one hand and at— are in a hot war so on the one hand and atthe— are in a hot war so on the one hand and at the same— are in a hot war so on the one hand and at the same time _ are in a hot war so on the one hand and at the same time in _ are in a hot war so on the one hand and at the same time in which the i and at the same time in which the role of— and at the same time in which the role of intelligence _ and at the same time in which the role of intelligence and _ and at the same time in which the role of intelligence and the - and at the same time in which the j role of intelligence and the seeing in the _ role of intelligence and the seeing in the course _ role of intelligence and the seeing in the course of _ role of intelligence and the seeing in the course of the _ role of intelligence and the seeing in the course of the war— role of intelligence and the seeing in the course of the war how - in the course of the war how critical— in the course of the war how critical the _ in the course of the war how critical the role _ in the course of the war how critical the role of— in the course of the war how i critical the role of intelligence has been _ critical the role of intelligence has been prior— critical the role of intelligence has been prior to _ critical the role of intelligence has been prior to the - critical the role of intelligence has been prior to the war- critical the role of intelligence has been prior to the war andl critical the role of intelligence - has been prior to the war and now in the course _ has been prior to the war and now in the course of— has been prior to the war and now in the course of this _ has been prior to the war and now in the course of this war. _ has been prior to the war and now in the course of this war. but _ has been prior to the war and now in the course of this war. but also - has been prior to the war and now in the course of this war. but also the. the course of this war. but also the role on _ the course of this war. but also the role on the — the course of this war. but also the role on the other— the course of this war. but also the role on the other side _ the course of this war. but also the role on the other side as _ the course of this war. but also the role on the other side as was - the course of this war. but also the role on the other side as was beingj role on the other side as was being said. not— role on the other side as was being said. not only— role on the other side as was being said, not only intelligence - role on the other side as was being said, not only intelligence but - role on the other side as was being said, not only intelligence but also| said, not only intelligence but also disinformation _ said, not only intelligence but also disinformation i5 _ said, not only intelligence but also disinformation is playing _ said, not only intelligence but also disinformation is playing in- said, not only intelligence but also disinformation is playing in there i disinformation is playing in there for really— disinformation is playing in there for really affecting _ disinformation is playing in there for really affecting a _ disinformation is playing in there for really affecting a much - disinformation is playing in there for really affecting a much widerl for really affecting a much wider sort of— for really affecting a much wider sort of array _ for really affecting a much wider sort of array of— for really affecting a much wider sort of array of the _ for really affecting a much wider sort of array of the society - for really affecting a much wider sort of array of the society and i sort of array of the society and sectors — sort of array of the society and sectors. submit _ sort of array of the society and sectors. submit only _ sort of array of the society and sectors. submit only did - sort of array of the society and sectors. submit only did we i sort of array of the society and i sectors. submit only did we have sort of array of the society and - sectors. submit only did we have to wake _ sectors. submit only did we have to wake up _ sectors. submit only did we have to wake up to— sectors. submit only did we have to wake up to a — sectors. submit only did we have to wake up to a hot— sectors. submit only did we have to wake up to a hot war— sectors. submit only did we have to wake up to a hot war and _ sectors. submit only did we have to wake up to a hot war and not - sectors. submit only did we have to| wake up to a hot war and not simply a cold— wake up to a hot war and not simply a cold war. — wake up to a hot war and not simply a cold war. but— wake up to a hot war and not simply a cold war, but one where - a cold war, but one where essentially this _ a cold war, but one where essentially this is - a cold war, but one where
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essentially this is a - a cold war, but one where essentially this is a game i a cold war, but one where i essentially this is a game that is being _ essentially this is a game that is being played _ essentially this is a game that is being played out— essentially this is a game that is being played out only _ essentially this is a game that is being played out only by - essentially this is a game that is being played out only by a i essentially this is a game that is being played out only by a few. being played out only by a few people — being played out only by a few people in _ being played out only by a few people in a _ being played out only by a few people in a few _ being played out only by a few people in a few places, - being played out only by a few people in a few places, but i being played out only by a few people in a few places, but isi people in a few places, but is really widespread _ people in a few places, but is really widespread across i people in a few places, but is- really widespread across society. robert. — really widespread across society. robert. there _ really widespread across society. robert, there were _ really widespread across society. robert, there were two - really widespread across society. robert, there were two stars i really widespread across society. | robert, there were two stars that were put on the langley wall this last week, two officers and we will know nothing about but who clearly gave their lives in the cause. does that suggest to us that the risk is going up for cia officers and will increase to rise as this war unfolds?— increase to rise as this war unfolds? , ., , :, , , ~ unfolds? yes. there are probably cia officers in ukraine _ unfolds? yes. there are probably cia officers in ukraine right _ unfolds? yes. there are probably cia officers in ukraine right now- unfolds? yes. there are probably cia officers in ukraine right now who i officers in ukraine right now who are being targeted by the russians and i think the russians have crossed that line where they are ready to kill americans that are on the front. there was a case in florida about three months ago where an american was arrested and believe may have been on a mission to kill a russian dissident, a former kgb officer. so i think with the salisbury attack and this is not coming to the us and there is a lot
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of people in the fbi who are worried that russian mobsters or russian intelligence are going to carry out hits in this country. whether that comes to pass or not, i don't know what they are very concerned about it. �* , ., what they are very concerned about it. 2 ., , :, , what they are very concerned about it. , :, , :, what they are very concerned about it. it's a story of the past but very relevant _ it. it's a story of the past but very relevant to _ it. it's a story of the past but very relevant to our - it. it's a story of the past but i very relevant to our immediate future. the fourth man if the book in robert baer is a great pleasure to talk to you, thank you for coming on. many bring you up to speed with what is happening in texas if you have justjoined us as we have havejustjoined us as we have had some breaking news in the last hour that at least two children have been killed and more than a dozen injured at a school in texas. let's bring in our correspondent who is following the story, barbara. what do we know? we are just getting in information as we speak and i can say that the attack took place in the small texas city named uvalde which is about 80 miles west of san antonio. the shooting started at noon and it went
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through school called rob element to school which is where the school districts and on twitter that was an active shooter on the grounds and just after one p:m., the police said they had a suspect in custody and we have information from the hospital in uvalde that says it had received 13 people, transferred there for treatment, and two people had died by the time they arrived at the hospital. we believe that most of the injured are children all that has not been clarified and is not clear what condition they are in either. in other hospital in san antonio said it had received two patients, one child and one adult injured from the shooting. 0bviously injured from the shooting. obviously the school has been notifying frantic parents about what's been going on, taking their cause and try to reunite them with their children and the district said it had designated a civic centre close to the school as a reunification site for parents to pick up their children the best information we have at the moment as this story is evolving. brute have at the moment as this story is
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evolvinr. ~ _, . ,, :, evolving. we will come back to you as and when _ evolving. we will come back to you as and when you _ evolving. we will come back to you as and when you get _ evolving. we will come back to you as and when you get more - evolving. we will come back to you as and when you get more detail. evolving. we will come back to you i as and when you get more detail and you're watching pictures here from uvalde and clearly a lot of worried parents on the scene hoping to find details and also seen pictures of the emergency services who have been fearing people away as well. it's a sickness, this, in american society, so many mass shootings already this year and one last week as i was saying in buffalo, two people killed in a grocery store there and now this. and the futility of it all is that politicians don't seem to engage with it in america. this. that politicians don't seem to engage with it in america. no, it's definitely a _ engage with it in america. no, it's definitely a sickness. _ engage with it in america. no, it's definitely a sickness. school- definitely a sickness. school shootings, these mass shootings. they have — shootings, these mass shootings. they have become part of the fabric of every _ they have become part of the fabric of every month that we experience here in— of every month that we experience here in the — of every month that we experience here in the us. i'm a parent and you never— here in the us. i'm a parent and you neverwant— here in the us. i'm a parent and you never want to — here in the us. i'm a parent and you neverwant to hear here in the us. i'm a parent and you never want to hear these things and you want— never want to hear these things and you want to — never want to hear these things and you want to look for solutions they want to _ you want to look for solutions they want to make sure you get policymakers that try to find the right _ policymakers that try to find the right policies that we can stop this and the _ right policies that we can stop this and the reality is in the last
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couple _ and the reality is in the last couple of— and the reality is in the last couple of years, gun sales have been hitting _ couple of years, gun sales have been hitting record breaking numbers as a result— hitting record breaking numbers as a result of— hitting record breaking numbers as a result of the black lives matter risa took— result of the black lives matter risa took place in 2020, gun cells all demographics rising in a dramatic— all demographics rising in a dramatic increase in so you probably have been— dramatic increase in so you probably have been people who don't have the proper— have been people who don't have the proper training with guns and just too many— proper training with guns and just too many guns out there and i don't know— too many guns out there and i don't know the _ too many guns out there and i don't know the solution is. i'm a parent, home—schooling i5 know the solution is. i'm a parent, home—schooling is not a solution for my household, but is something that parents think about every day that they take — parents think about every day that they take their kids to school and it's unfortunately in american it'5 unfortunately in american sickness _ it's unfortunately in american sickness. ., , , sickness. the thing about it because already there _ sickness. the thing about it because already there have _ sickness. the thing about it because already there have been _ sickness. the thing about it because already there have been 26 - sickness. the thing about it because already there have been 26 school. already there have been 26 school shootings in the last 12 months. students are drilled now and what to do when a live shooter, an active shooter is in the school and of course texas is an open carry state. they are carrying high calibre weapons, rapid—fire weapons, so you only need someone like that in a school for a short period of time and create an immense amount of damage.
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and create an immense amount of damare. .., . and create an immense amount of damare. ., , and create an immense amount of damare. :, , , damage. the carnage is unbelievable. it's 'ust not damage. the carnage is unbelievable. it's just rrot red _ damage. the carnage is unbelievable. it'sjust not red states _ damage. the carnage is unbelievable. it'sjust not red states can _ damage. the carnage is unbelievable. it'sjust not red states can this i it'sjust not red states can this happens — it'sjust not red states can this happens in california, all over the us so— happens in california, all over the us so as — happens in california, all over the us so as not one particular law in one state — us so as not one particular law in one state that's going to solve this _ one state that's going to solve this. probably much deeper than throwing — this. probably much deeper than throwing new books on the loss but the sickness i5 throwing new books on the loss but the sickness is taking too many lives _ the sickness is taking too many lives here — the sickness is taking too many lives here and my party, they sort of do _ lives here and my party, they sort of do have — lives here and my party, they sort of do have the view that guns are the solution to a lot of these things — the solution to a lot of these things. to violence out there, but too much — things. to violence out there, but too much guns does create a lot of other problems as well. more guns, not less, other problems as well. more guns, rrot less. is — other problems as well. more guns, rrot less. is it _ other problems as well. more guns, not less, is it the _ other problems as well. more guns, not less, is it the answer, _ other problems as well. more guns, not less, is it the answer, discuss. i not less, is it the answer, discuss. we will bring you more from texas as and when we get it. it's another big night in american politics with results expected in key primaries around the country. not only will those results tell us who will face who come the pivotal midterm elections in november, it'll tell us whether the former president donald trump still has the power to shape his party. in key primaries around the country. the focus is on georgia. two races to watch —
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the republican primary for the georgia senate seat currently held by democrat raphael warnock. three candidates are in with a shot. herschel walker, backed by donald trump. challenging him, the georgia agriculture commissioner gary black and a military vet latham saddler. and the other the battle for state governor. stacey abrahams stands unopposed for the democrats, but it's a two—way fight for the republican nomination between brian kemp, who's backed by former vice president mike pence, and david perdue, backed by donald trump. i've been speaking to charles bullock, political science professor at the university of georgia, and asked him why we should care about these primaries with the midterms so far out. well, because in many instances, the person who wins the primary goes on and wins the general election. sometimes with very little opposition, so in many states and in many situations, the primary is the election which really counts. in georgia, it's not necessarily the case, but in many places it is.
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let's talk about the governor's race, first of all, in georgia. we've got the main challenger david perdue backed by donald trump up against the incumbent brian kemp, who is backed by mike pence. what does that tell us about the split in the gop? yeah, i think what we're seeing here with this gubernatorial race in georgia is that some of the republican establishment is finally coming forward, that they have been eclipsed for five years now, but mike pence came to georgia and did an event with governor kemp and then also the republican governors association have spent millions and millions of dollars promoting governor kemp, and even former president george bush did a fundraiser for kemp. so, we're seeing much more action in the anti—trump group than we've seen for years, so georgia may, as we look back,
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say in a couple of years' distance, may point to georgia this is where the establishment came forward and was willing to take on trump for the first time. is it possible that some of these candidates that are running in the deep south, with trump's endorsement which is valuable because we know that the base does listen to donald trump, but is it possible that he undermines seats, positions the gop have, puts at risk battles that they can be winning? well, that's certainly possible. because we know that there are some voters in much of the deep south and the really critical voter is going to be, say, white college—educated voter, and some of them still think of themselves, many of them think of themselves as being republicans, but some can't bring themselves to vote for trump and by extension might not be able to bring themselves to vote
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for trump's candidates. and that's what we saw in georgia in the two special senate elections that were decided in january of 2021. we will move away from that and will come back to the primaries tomorrow but i want to focus on this situation in texas as it is getting much worse, 15 dead. 1a students and one teacher. this is in the area of uvalde. this is in the area of san antonio, in texas, and open carry state. barbara pletcher has been watching this for us that someone who went into the school and was courted by authorities in the future is in custody but as we were just discussing, when you are carrying high calibre weapons into a packed school and he were letting off rounds in close proximity, these are the sort of cavities and deaths that can occur. let me bring you back in
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on this, brian. this is going to put it up where they are some of the worst school shootings we have seen in texas. is there a bar that we reach an america where finally the politicians do engage with it. i politicians do engage with it. i don't see it anytime soon. you would've thought it would happen after the — would've thought it would happen after the connecticut shooting or adam _ after the connecticut shooting or adam lanza come relation, killed those _ adam lanza come relation, killed those 32 — adam lanza come relation, killed those 32 kindergartner. you think this would've happened in the 19905 with columbine. what law fixes this? i with columbine. what law fixes this? i mean. _ with columbine. what law fixes this? i mean. we _ with columbine. what law fixes this? i mean, we are open to it, what law fixes _ i mean, we are open to it, what law fixes it? _ i mean, we are open to it, what law fixes it? a _ i mean, we are open to it, what law fixes it? a ban on guns which some americans— fixes it? a ban on guns which some americans want. what law fixes it? let's _ americans want. what law fixes it? let's have — americans want. what law fixes it? let's have a — americans want. what law fixes it? let's have a discussion about what law can _ let's have a discussion about what law can fix — let's have a discussion about what law can fix this.— law can fix this. looking at this from afar— law can fix this. looking at this from afar and _ law can fix this. looking at this from afar and how _ law can fix this. looking at this from afar and how many i law can fix this. looking at this from afar and how many times| law can fix this. looking at this i from afar and how many times have law can fix this. looking at this - from afar and how many times have we beenin from afar and how many times have we been in this position talking about
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a story like this and nothing seems to happen in america and that is immense frustration on the one side of the debate but on the other, as he said, it comes back to the right to carry, the solution is more guns and not less. i to carry, the solution is more guns and rrot less-— and not less. i mean i guess i'm aroin to and not less. i mean i guess i'm going to be _ and not less. i mean i guess i'm going to be quintessentially i going to be quintessentially european _ going to be quintessentially european about— going to be quintessentially european about this, i going to be quintessentially european about this, but i going to be quintessentially european about this, but toj going to be quintessentially. european about this, but to be honest. — european about this, but to be honest. you _ european about this, but to be honest, you kind _ european about this, but to be honest, you kind of— european about this, but to be honest, you kind of look- european about this, but to be honest, you kind of look at- european about this, but to be| honest, you kind of look at this situation — honest, you kind of look at this situation from _ honest, you kind of look at this situation from afar— honest, you kind of look at this situation from afar and - honest, you kind of look at this situation from afar and the i honest, you kind of look at this| situation from afar and the only real difference _ situation from afar and the only real difference that _ situation from afar and the only real difference that you - situation from afar and the only real difference that you can i situation from afar and the only real difference that you can seej real difference that you can see between — real difference that you can see between america _ real difference that you can see between america and _ real difference that you can see between america and europe i real difference that you can see between america and europe is real difference that you can see i between america and europe is the fact that _ between america and europe is the fact that they— between america and europe is the fact that they are _ between america and europe is the fact that they are in the _ between america and europe is the fact that they are in the us, - fact that they are in the us, there is the right to carry guns. ijust find _ is the right to carry guns. ijust find it— is the right to carry guns. ijust find it really— is the right to carry guns. ijust find it really perplexing. - is the right to carry guns. ijust find it really perplexing. whyi is the right to carry guns. ijust| find it really perplexing. why is is the right to carry guns. ijust i find it really perplexing. why is it that the — find it really perplexing. why is it that the issue _ find it really perplexing. why is it that the issue of _ find it really perplexing. why is it that the issue of carrying - find it really perplexing. why is it that the issue of carrying guns i find it really perplexing. why is it that the issue of carrying guns is| that the issue of carrying guns is not discussed politically- that the issue of carrying guns is not discussed politically really. that the issue of carrying guns i5| not discussed politically really as it should — not discussed politically really as it should be _ not discussed politically really as it should be. frankly— not discussed politically really as it should be. frankly speaking, i| it should be. frankly speaking, i 'u5t it should be. frankly speaking, i just cannot _ it should be. frankly speaking, i just cannot see _ it should be. frankly speaking, i just cannot see what _ it should be. frankly speaking, i just cannot see what other i it should be. frankly speaking, i. just cannot see what other possible solution _ just cannot see what other possible solution there — just cannot see what other possible solution there can _ just cannot see what other possible solution there can be _ just cannot see what other possible solution there can be given- just cannot see what other possible solution there can be given that - just cannot see what other possible| solution there can be given that the only difference _ solution there can be given that the only difference between _ solution there can be given that the only difference between america i only difference between america and places— only difference between america and places like _ only difference between america and places like europe _ only difference between america and places like europe is _ only difference between america and places like europe is precisely- places like europe is precisely this —
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places like europe is precisely this. , t, t, places like europe is precisely this. , ., ., ., this. the senator for texas ted cruz has 'ust this. the senator for texas ted cruz has just responded _ this. the senator for texas ted cruz hasjust responded and _ this. the senator for texas ted cruz hasjust responded and marie - this. the senator for texas ted cruz hasjust responded and marie to - this. the senator for texas ted cruzj hasjust responded and marie to the has just responded and marie to the statement, heidi and i are from really lifting up in prayer the children and families in a horrific shooting in uvalde and we are in close contact local officials with the precise details are still unfolding. thank you to local authorities and respondent for reacting so swiftly. what sort of reaction do we get from president joe biden from the buffalo shooting at what rhetoric have we heard from him on gun control? is anything we can do equipment i think buffalo was very much a racial shooting and i think he talked about convicting the people on race crimes or race hating crimes. �* , , ., ~ , crimes. and they should. anything rash like that _ crimes. and they should. anything rash like that should _ crimes. and they should. anything rash like that should be _ crimes. and they should. anything rash like that should be the - crimes. and they should. anything rash like that should be the case. | rash like that should be the case. but we _ rash like that should be the case. but we talk about having this debate and we _ but we talk about having this debate and we have had the gun control debate _ and we have had the gun control debate in — and we have had the gun control debate in the us was of the voters had made — debate in the us was of the voters had made the decision that they won't _ had made the decision that they won't politicians to support second amendment year after year. this is
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not like _ amendment year after year. this is not like we — amendment year after year. this is not like we have not discussed this. we have _ not like we have not discussed this. we have discussed this every month when _ we have discussed this every month when there — we have discussed this every month when there is a school shooting and the voters _ when there is a school shooting and the voters time and time again have made _ the voters time and time again have made the _ the voters time and time again have made the decision to send politicians who want to defend the constitution, who see their possibility defending the constitution and defending individual rights to bear arms. don't — individual rights to bear arms. don't be — individual rights to bear arms. don't be mistaken. it's not like we have _ don't be mistaken. it's not like we have not— don't be mistaken. it's not like we have not talked about this issue. it's have not talked about this issue. it's been — have not talked about this issue. it's been forced on us all the time and the _ it's been forced on us all the time and the voters are made this decision— and the voters are made this decision and you bet two presidents come _ decision and you bet two presidents come up _ decision and you bet two presidents come up barack 0bama and bill clinton, — come up barack 0bama and bill clinton, i— come up barack 0bama and bill clinton, i was a democrat in the bill clinton _ clinton, i was a democrat in the bill clinton era took about gun violence — bill clinton era took about gun violence and bring it up and it's never— violence and bring it up and it's never been _ violence and bring it up and it's never been enough to change the sake of the _ never been enough to change the sake of the american public who support the second — of the american public who support the second amendment and those are the second amendment and those are the ones _ the second amendment and those are the ones who are voting and those are the _ the ones who are voting and those are the ones who make the policy decisions — are the ones who make the policy decisions. so we have had this debate — decisions. so we have had this debate. all we have just had to day is another— debate. all we have just had to day is another example of a tragic, tragic— is another example of a tragic, tragic situation.— tragic situation. 18-year-old government _ tragic situation. 18-year-old
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government is _ tragic situation. 18-year-old government is what - tragic situation. 18-year-old government is what we - tragic situation. 18-year-old government is what we are l tragic situation. 18-year-old - government is what we are being told, 18 years old he was killed 15 people in uvalde close to san antonio, ia children and one teacher and more of this on bbc. thank you forjoining us. good night. hello there. it's been an unsettled start so far to this week, and it looks like low pressure will continue to bring showers or even longer spells of rain for the next few days. and then things look like they'll turn a little bit quieter by the end of the week. as we see high pressure build in, we'll see increasing amounts of sunshine. but we're even likely to see a spell of windy weather for a time around the middle part of the week with this new area of low pressure pushing in from the north—west. it'll bring a frontal system across the country through the day on wednesday, fizzling out as it reaches southern and eastern england. behind it, it will brighten up through wednesday afternoon with plenty of sunshine. further showers around. these will be blustery. it's going to be a windy day across the board, but particularly so across irish sea coasts and across northern scotland. but at least the showers will rattle their way through quite quickly.
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temperature—wise, i think we're looking round the mid to high teens for most, which is around the seasonal norm. now, through wednesday night, it looks like a ridge of high pressure will settle things down, and then we see another frontal system push in to more central areas for thursday. that'll bring some wet weather to northern ireland and then into northern england and wales by the end of the night. mild in the south, a bit chillierfurther north. so, this is the pressure chart for thursday. you can see this complicated weather front spreading through central areas of the country throughout the day. the rain here will tend to fizzle out, and i think, apart from the odd shower around for england and wales, it'll stay pretty cloudy, i think, for most. further north, brighter, certainly for scotland, but there'll be sunshine and showers, and some of these showers again will be blustery. it'll be windy here, and temperatures ranging from the mid to high teens once again. as we move out of thursday into friday, it does look like this area of high pressure in the south starts to nudge its way northwards, so that'll settle things down for much of england and wales and northern ireland.
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increasing amounts of sunshine. still, though, for scotland, closer to that area of low pressure, it'll be windy again with further blustery showers, and some of them will be on the heavy side. feeling a bit cooler here. we've got low to mid teens in the north but a bit warmer further south, because we've got more sunshine around. so, friday and into this coming weekend, high pressure looks to dominate the scene, although we will start to pick up northerly winds. and these winds will be quite brisk across northern and eastern parts of the country, we think, so they'll feed in a bit of cloud, and it'll feel a lot cooler. the best of the sunshine will be further south and west, where we're likely to see around 20 degrees. much cooler, certainly closer to the coasts across the north and the east. a similar story on sunday. brisk northerly winds, which will make it feel quite chilly across northern and eastern areas. variable amounts of cloud. we could see a few showers developing here and there, and i think the temperatures across the board will be a bit lower, the high teens in the south, low teens further north. now, into next week, we have a discrepancy between models.
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this is ecmwf, which is the european model. it wants to keep high pressure with us for a while into next week and then allow low pressure to push up from the south. that'll bring warmer southerly winds but outbreaks of rain, some of which could be heavy and thundery. the other scenario is the gfs model. this is the american model. it wants to start off with high pressure and keep high pressure with us throughout much of next week, which means things will be largely dry, there'll be quite a bit of sunshine around, but it will be a bit cooler both by day and by night. over the next few days, we will firm up on the details to see which model will become more accurate, so stay tuned.
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tonight at ten — more questions for borisjohnson as ministers consider the latest revelations about gatherings in lockdown. has about --atherins in lockdown. the prime minister l about has the prime minister been honest about having — has the prime minister been honest about having parties _ has the prime minister been honest about having parties in _ has the prime minister been honest about having parties in downing - about having parties in downing street? — those attending cabinet this morning were aware that for the first time insiders have told the bbc what happened at the gatherings. borisjohnson is said to take the revelations very seriously amid insider talk of crowded parties and a prime minister ignoring the rules. he was not there saying this should not be happening. he was not saying, "can everyone break up and go home, can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on?" no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. we'll have more on the latest accounts as the official report
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on the lockdown gatherings could appear tomorrow.

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